IAIA - Institute of American Indian Arts

Faculty

Core Faculty

Porter Swentzell

PorterSwentzle

Porter Swentzel is a former adjunct faculty member at Northern New Mexico College where he taught a number of courses such as: Spirit of Place, Native Senses of Place; Pueblo Indian History; History, Literature, Art and Philosophy and Tewa Ethnobiology: Plants and Animals in the Tewa World. Porter is also currently engaged in a number of research projects: The Tewa Verb Project; Sushi in Cortez: Mesa Verde Stories and the Pre-Contact pueblo Diet Project. He has also presented numerous cultural presentations and symposiums, such as Corn the Pueblos; Thaanugeh: Tewa Perspective of the Galisteo Basin and Tewa Origins, to name a few.  Porter has also partnered with other Native artists and writers in a number of collaborative publications works, such as Lexicon of Khap’on-Tewa Verbs & Pronouns: Patterns and Use and The Story of Rosie’s Rate: A True Story. 

He has a B.A. in Integrated Studies with an emphasis in Pueblo Indian Studies from Northern New Mexico College and a M.A. in interdisciplinary Studies from Western New Mexico University.

Porter Swentzell
Indigenous Liberal Studies IAIACore Faculty
Work Phone: 505-424-5795
Categories: Uncategorized
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Contributing Faculty

N. Scott Momaday

SMomaday

A member of the Kiowa Tribe, N. Scott Momaday grew up on reservations in the Southwest where his parents were also teachers. After attending the University of New Mexico, Momaday won a poetry fellowship to Stanford University’s creative writing program. In 1963, Momaday earned a Ph.D. in English literature. His first novel, House Made of Dawn in 1969, earned him a Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Since then, he has written children’s books and several award-winning books. 

He has taught at various colleges, including IAIA and the University of Arizona. In 2007, President George W. Bush awarded him the National Medal of Arts for his writings and his work that celebrate and preserve Native American art and oral tradition.