Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

Past Exhibitions

Emergence: John Feodorov»

January 15 – March 31, 2011;

John Feodorov is a conceptual artist whose work addresses contemporary issues of consumerism, the environment, and identity. With Emergence, Feodorov explores the BP oil spill and delves deeper into broader issues concerning our connection and disconnection to the natural world, identity, and place.

Embargo Collective»

January 15 – March 31, 2011;

Each of the artists has an impressive body of work, demonstrating exceptional talent and vision. Each has a different focus in media arts: documentary, fictional narrative and experimental. And each represents a diversity of Indigenous nations. They represent a generation of contemporary media artists who are at the forefront of the changing global landscape of Indigenous cinema and media arts.

Dry Ice»

August 2, 2010 – January 2, 2011;

“Dry Ice” is a term that denotes frozen carbon dioxide, which, when taken out of a frigid environment, rapidly dissolves from a solid form into a gaseous state. In the context of this exhibition, it is meant to evoke the shifting significance of the Alaskan polar landscape in contemporary Alaska Native art.

Oblique Drift»

August 2, 2010 – January 2, 2011;

Alaskan artist Nicholas Galanin brings his transformative work to the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, which extends from his series “The Imaginary Indian,” which juxtaposes manufactured Northwest Coast masks and French toile.

It Wasn’t The Dream of Golden Cities: Postcommodity»

August 2, 2010- January 2, 2011;

It Wasn’t The Dream of Golden Cities is a commissioned response to Santa Fe’s 400th celebration by Postcommodity an interdisciplinary Native arts collective comprised of Raven Chacon (Navajo), Kade L. Twist (Cherokee), Steven Yazzie (Laguna/Navajo) and Nathan Young (Delaware/Kiowa/Pawnee).

ROUND UP: Recent Video Work by Torry Mendoza»

August 2, 2010- January 2, 2011;

Video artist Torry Mendoza’s work centers on the re-appropriation and deconstruction of Native identity in popular culture. Through digital editing, re-presentations, and satirical juxtapositions, Mendoza challenges dominant society’s portrayal of Native Americans in order to call attention to the accepted perceptions of “Indigeneity.”

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