Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

MoCNA January Exhibitions

Santa Fe, NM | Dec 17, 2013 –

 

 

Wendy Red Star, Enit, 2010 lithograph, (image courtesy of Crow's Shadow Institute of Arts Collection)

Wendy Red Star, Enit, 2010 lithograph, (image courtesy of Crow’s Shadow Institute of Arts Collection)

ARTiculations in Print featuring:
Crow’s Shadow Institute of Arts Collection
January 25 – July 31, 2014
Main Gallery

A selection of prints from the Crow’s Shadow Press signifies the ever-growing portfolio of prints produced over a 20-year period since the founding of the Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts, located in Pendleton, Oregon. The exhibition encompasses the work of many outstanding artists of diverse backgrounds and media and includes Rick Bartow, James Lavadour, Wendy Red Star, John Feodorov, Lillian Pitt, Corwin Clairmont and Whitney Minthorn, among others working in collaboration with Crow’s Shadow Master Printer Frank Janzen.

About the institute: The Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts is a nonprofit organization that provides opportunities for Native artists through artistic development. Founded in 1992 by artist James Lavadour, the institute is located on the Umitilla Indian Reservation in Oregon. Crow’s Shadow serves Native, as well as non-Native artists and their community within the Plateau region by offering gallery space, a world-class printmaking studio, a residency program, and a venue for cultural artistic practices.
www.crowsshadow.org

 

Kenojuak Ashevak (1927-2013), Peaceful Repose, ed 20/50, 2007, etching and aquatint, 31 x 23.5 (Edd Guarino Collection, Image courtesy of MoCNA)

Kenojuak Ashevak (1927-2013), Peaceful Repose, ed 20/50, 2007, etching and aquatint, 31 x 23.5 (Edd Guarino Collection, Image courtesy of MoCNA)

Kenojuak Ashevak (1927-2013)
January 25 – July 31, 2014
Main Gallery

A selection of prints by internationally celebrated Inuk artist Kenojuak Ashevak (1927-2013) from the Edward J. Guarino Collection celebrate the Cape Dorset artist’s contribution to the art world and the Kinngait Studio, formerly known as the West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative. Ashevak’s work was part of the first print collection to be produced by the co-op and has since continued to represent the powerful emblematic graphics depicting the visual voice of the Arctic.

About the artist: Kenojuak Ashevak (1927-2013), one of Canada’s most acclaimed artists, was born in the Canadian Arctic into the group of Inuit known as Seekoosilarmiut, meaning “the people of the coast where there is no ice.”  Recognized internationally, Kenojuak Ashevak’s accomplishments include receiving the Order of Canada’s Medal of Service in 1967, membership into the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts in 1974 and she was made a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1982. Among many accomplishments and accolades, Ashevak also received honorary degrees from Queen’s University and the University of Toronto.

 

John Hitchcock, Cotton Electric, 2013, 30 x 44 (image courtesy of the artist)

John Hitchcock, Cotton Electric, 2013, 30 x 44 (image courtesy of the artist)

John Hitchcock: Traces of the Plains
January 25 – July 31, 2014
Fritz Scholder Gallery

The exhibition Traces of the Plains consists of works on paper, multimedia installation of printed matter and video that reference the trauma of war and fragility of life.

About the artist: John Hitchcock uses the print medium with its long history of social and political commentary to explore relationships of community, land and culture. He is an artist and professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he teaches screenprinting, relief cut, and installation art. He earned his MFA in printmaking and photography at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, and received his BFA from Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma. Hitchcock has received numerous awards, including The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artistic Innovation and Collaboration grant and has exhibited extensively.
www.hybridpress.net

David Sloan,Tsísnáłbáhí (Honey Bee) #1, ed 11/13, 2013, Mono print, 11x 15 (Image courtesy of the artist)

David Sloan,Tsísnáłbáhí (Honey Bee) #1, ed 11/13, 2013, Mono print, 11x 15 (Image courtesy of the artist)

David Sloan:
T’ah aniiłtso Yéé’bii’ Neiikai (Endangered Species)
January 25 – July 31, 2014
Foyer Gallery

In the exhibition, David Sloan’s mono-prints include silkscreened images of endangered species with their Diné names over lithograph reproductions of old 1970′s Navajo Times newspaper ads. Sloan’s conscious intentions compare and contrast eco-philosophies of American consumer culture with traditional Diné world perspective.

About the Artist: David Sloan, who works in the mediums of printmaking, jewelry, and painting, was born and raised in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He is Diné and Tohono O’odham from his mother’s side, and of Irish and English decent on his father’s side.  In his artwork, Sloan draws attention to his Diné culture and language, and the effects of the ever-changing environment. He received a Bachelor of Arts in 2-Dimensional Studio Arts with a minor in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona in 2003.
 www.todichiiniirudeboy.com

 

Norman-Akers-web

Norman Akers, The Red Hill, ed. AP, ca 1988, serigraph, 20 x 22, Collection of MoCNA (image courtesy of MoCNA)

Bon à Tirer: Prints from MoCNA’s Permanent Collection
January 25 – March 31, 2014  
May 24 – July 31, 2014
Hall Gallery

Bon à Tirer or more commonly seen written as “B.A.T.” on a Fine Art print, is a French term meaning good to pull. For the purpose of this exhibition, curators Tatiana Lomahaftewa-Singer and Alex Peña are metaphorically using the term for curatorial authority that references their discretion to qualify a print good to pull or pull out of MoCNA’s permanent collection for exhibition. Artists selected include Norman Akers, Harry Fonseca, Keri Ataumbi, Duane Slick, C. Maxx Stevens, Marie Watt and Emmi Whitehorse.

MoCNA’s Annual IAIA BFA Exhibition
Selected works by:

Shaun Beyale | Frederick Big Lake | Rylan Bourke | Heidi Brandow  Deborah Corbett | Stephanie De La Rosa | Madge Duus | Koty Jim | Rondee Graham | Quinn Kelly | Sharon Lewis | Dakota Mace | Deepak Maharjan | Carol Melting Tallow | Nicholas Salazar | Crystal Tohee | Laura Walkingstick | Adrian Wall | Veneron Yazzen

The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is proud to present the annual Institute of American Indian Arts BFA Student Exhibition. This year’s BFA exhibition celebrates the class of 2013/14 and showcases a diversity of styles that combine traditional skill and contemporary vision.
The exhibition features a wide range of works selected by a jury and includes photography, painting, sculpture, installation and jewelry.

You are invited to MoCNA for the closing reception on
Thursday, May 15 | 4:00 – 6:00pm

 

Image courtesy: Sikumi (ON THE ICE)

Image courtesy: Sikumi (ON THE ICE)

Native American Short Films presented by Sundance Institute at MoCNA
January 25 – March 31, 2014
beginning again on May 24 – July 31, 2014
Helen Hardin Media Gallery

Featuring films from Sundance Institute’s Native American and Indigenous Program:
Sikumi (ON THE ICE) – An Iñuit hunter takes his dog team out on the frozen Arctic Ocean in search of seals, and inadvertently becomes a witness to a murder. Director: Andrew Okpeaha MacLean (Inupiaq)

Nikamowin (SONG) – Deconstructing and reconstructing Cree narrative, this film experiments with language to create a linguistic soundscape. Director: Kevin Lee Burton (Swampy Cree)

Shimásání – When Mary Jane finds a World Geography book that shows her an entirely new world, she must decide whether to maintain her traditional Navajo reservation lifestyle with her grandmother, or go out into the larger world. Director and screenwriter: Blackhorse Lowe (Navajo)

Gesture Down – I Don’t Sing – A graceful and personal adaptation of the poem “Gesture Down to Guatemala” by the late Native American Writer James Welch. Director: Ceder Sherbert (Kumeyaay)

Two Cars One Night /New Zealand – Sometimes first love is found in the most unlikely of places, like in the car park outside the Te Kaha pub. Director and screenwriter: Taika Waititi (Te Whanau Apanui)

“MoCNA has a excellent history of showcasing the most exciting contemporary art coming out of the Native community and Sundance Institute is honored to offer short films as part of their exhibition,” said Bird Runningwater (Mescalero Apache), director of the Sundance Institute Native American and Indigenous Program.  “The five acclaimed indigenous short films will inspire audiences with their unique stories told within a limited time frame.”

About Sundance Institute’s Native American and Indigenous Program: Celebrating its 20th anniversary and rooted in the recognition of a rich tradition of storytelling and artistic expression by Native American and Indigenous peoples, Sundance Institute’s Native American and Indigenous Program operates the Native Forum at Sundance Film Festival, as well as the NativeLab Film Fellowship and the Native Producers Fellowship established for emerging Native American/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian filmmakers. The program has also established filmmaker labs in New Zealand and Australia. The program has supported such projects as Bran Nue Dae, Here I Am, Four Sheets to the Wind, Barking Water, Eagle vs Shark, Boy, Miss Navajo, Grab, Sikumi, On the Ice, and Mosquita y Mari.